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QOG lunch seminar with Guo Xu

Research profile seminar

The QoG Institute regularly organizes seminars related to research on Quality of Government. The seminars address the theoretical and empirical problem of how political institutions of high quality can be created and maintained as well as the effects of Quality of Government on a number of policy areas, such as health, the environment, social policy, and poverty.

Speakers are invited from the international research community and experts from NGOs and other organizations to the lunch seminars. The seminars last for one hour and include a short presentation by the speaker (30-35 min) followed by a joint discussion about the topic.

If nothing else is indicated, the seminars are held in English.

Title of the seminar:
Social Proximity and Bureaucrat Performance: Evidence from India

Abstract:
Using exogenous variation in social proximity generated by an allocation rule, we find that bureaucrats assigned to their home states are perceived to be more corrupt and less able to withstand illegitimate political pressure. Despite this, we observe that home officers are more likely to be promoted in the later stages of their careers. To understand this dissonance between performance and promotion we show that incoming Chief Ministers preferentially promote home officers that come from the same home district. Taken together, our results suggest that social proximity hampers bureaucrat performance by facilitating political capture and corruption.

Lecturer: Guo Xu, Assistant Professor, Berkeley Haas School of Business

Date: 2/13/2019

Time: 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Categories: Social Sciences

Location: Stora Skansen (B336), Sprängkullsgatan 19

Contact person: Tove Wikehult

Phone: 031 786 6356

Page Manager: |Last update: 8/16/2010
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